FSM Solar Energy Project

What follows is from the Pacific Islands Report this AM:

Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat

Suva, Fiji
May 14, 2012

FSM To Access $4 Million For Solar Power Installation

The Federated States of Micronesia (FSM)
is seeking to reduce its carbon emissions by 500 tonnes annually with
anticipated savings of approximately US$486,000 in diesel costs per year
through the use of renewable energy.
FSM will now access its US$4 million
allocation from the Pacific Environment Community (PEC) Fund to
supplement electricity generation through solar energy on its dispersed
northern Pacific states.
The PEC Fund is administered by the
Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat on behalf of the Government of Japan,
with projects developed and implemented by each participating Forum
Island Country (FIC). FSM States of Yap, Chuuk, Pohnpei and
Kosrae will each benefit from the FSM PEC Fund project to be managed by
the Energy Division of the FSM Government’s Department of Resources and
Development. The project will see the installation of grid-connected solar photovoltaic systems of 150 kilowatt peak in each of the states.
While meeting with President Mori and
Vice President Alik of FSM in Pohnpei in May, the Secretary General of
the Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat, Tuiloma Neroni Slade, took the
opportunity to congratulate FSM on the development of its PEC Fund
proposal. "FSM’s PEC Fund project is anticipated
to provide significant benefits to each of the four states of FSM - Yap,
Chuuk, Pohnpei and Kosrae. I wish FSM the very best with implementation
and look forward to a sustainable and valuable project," said the
Secretary General.
The FSM PEC Fund project is anticipated
to further contribute 1.7% electricity generation to the national
renewable energy target of 30% energy from renewable energy sources by
2020. "We are currently working with FSM
officials to prepare a Financing Agreement to enable implementation of
the approved project at the earliest," said the Secretary General. To date, the Governments of Cook
Islands, Fiji, Nauru, Samoa, Solomon Islands and Tuvalu have accessed
the PEC Fund and are implementing projects in-country.
The PEC Fund is a commitment by the
Government of Japan of ¥6.8 billion (approx US$66 million) to support
Forum Island Country (FIC) projects with a focus on the provision of
solar power generation systems and sea water desalination plants, or a
combination of both technologies.
The PEC Fund is guided by a Joint
Committee (JC), chaired by the Secretary General of the Forum
Secretariat. A Technical Advisory Group (TAG) comprising technical
experts recommended by the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC),
Pacific Power Association (PPA) and the Government of Japan, is
responsible for assessing all PEC Fund project proposals and makes
recommendations to the JC.

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Comments


  • should the nations own fuel for energy supplier, PetroCorp, diversify into renewable energy supply?
  • edited May 2012

    Great News! wow, we need to race forth for the future technology maintenance of this solar industry, we need to prepared funding for career field bride student who are interested in this new global energy industry and send them off to those affiliated institution..

    thats what i was had in mind a few years agoo, Thanks to Sarem for your great update!

     

  • congratulation to all FSM, Now its time to go for privatization of that government agency PUC to make room for economic growth..the best way!..good luck on future development of the nation.
  • edited May 2012
    Domo Arigato Gozaimashita JAPAN!!!
  • edited May 2012

    Sea Water Desalination Plants ---- the first step towards OTEC.  Our President must employ everything within his power to encourage JAPAN to invest into FSM in return for open trade targeted at their most Prized Delicacy.

    Ikimashou JAPAN!!!

  • Has Geothermal power generating been explored in the four major states in FSM?
  • Japan  is offering FSM assistance to Solar Power  this time, last year Japan Offer RMI the OTEC Energy, As a matters of fact work is underway to buld the power plant on Kwajalein atoll in the Marshall Islands... what else is new?
  • Here is my final though on this solar industry. We should gather all that nation or invite them others to set up a base secular institution on Solar Energy so that we dont have to sent our student afar which will not guarantee there education for various reason.
  •  What wrong with the COM of FSM?..  faster and more convenient..
  • Thank God... Thank you Japan! imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimage
  • for those who are interested, the new and the only institute in the country for Solar Energy  is located at Denver Colorado. just opened, and is taking addmission as of right now by the name, Echo institute of solar energy.
  • edited May 2012

    hey chaninway;

    what hanky proposed is we need to have one or two atleast of the solar industry, the market, the institution to set up in our region so that we dont spend more money sending student off to go as far as Denver Colorado which is very cleared to some of us that place is freaky cold as a freezer box..

    Maybe if, we can find a way to lure that institution here in our region by introducing and promote that market farter to our US territories and Commonwealth. Mainwhile, lets focus now on the south pacific brothers and sisters which they had the based ideology.

  •  I understand you points  Mercy, Thats why  I pointed to COM as a starter. The concept about solar industry, I belive this industry had been introduced into our territories long before we knew it. If the idea is to build factories  within the region, that I doubt it will be come materialized because of the fact the Obama t Policy has called upon all overseas US companies to returned home and do business at home soil.. thats one reason I dont think so  it is the best  option to explore.. I think it will be a waste of times and efforts..
  •  If Im not mistaken, the OTEC energy is the only technology that has not been commercialized yet, and the Project going on in the RMI is initiated as a pilot project that will eventually  ( if successsful) be  installed within  the rest of the Pacific Islands communities..

  • edited June 2012

    chaninway...

    You fail number one, the commonwealth and Guam are considered US soil, again, your failed  100 times when you said. " think it will be a waste of times and efforts."

    you see, the US is not the only country in the race for renewable engergy by reducing carbon dioxide. The Kyodo Protocol, The UN, The Greenpeace and UNICEF much much more..

    You must be living on telephone pole electricity distribution. Do you know how much the govt spending on crude oil diesel and gasoline? Perhaps, not to mention the dept of transportation as well the shipping industry and commerc oxy-moron taxes.

    The bottom line is we cannot win the war of oil the Middleaster will always play the game and fluctuate the price.

     Carbon dioxide has a tramatic risk for  the layer of our earth atmosphere, however  If we continue to ignore the risk will be great of natural disaster submerging our islands under water. We must not waste time and effort and come to reality and use what God has place and created for us to use, The Sun!

  •  you are right  Mercy, I think what Obama meant  to do is to make productions ( manufactor) of all consumers products in the u.s.a.. To trying to bring this industry into our region is an option that  has so many obstecals to overcome before it can be happening  not to mention the cost of  initiating  a  solar factory on the islands?..nice!

    Rest assure that the wrold is  on the move right now for renewable energy to fight climate changes..And we, as small islands nations are in this fight as well even if we are the least contributors to the impact of the change,, we need to keep  conservation measures at top priority.
  • Thank You Japan for your great generosity! what then we can offer them in return?
  • You don't need Obama's permission to build solar panels in your country. Just a private individual or company willing to invest the money needed to get started. Private ventures are usually more successful than government ventures.
  • @FarmerJim,  you are exactly right, we dont need Obama's permission, what I meant  in my post is simple the fact that It is a far reach goal, but I agree with fact that this is an option worth look into. Im all for private venture in this industry,  but some places like  Republic of the Marshall Islands, the government is  working into make  their energy company  turn privatization.. Hope all is for the betterment, but again, like this news  up there about what happene in UK progress on solar energy.. I think something to be aware of also..other then that, more solar to the tropical nation ia probably the  best way ahead..
  • Solar energy is especially useful in tropical areas because the sun is so intense. I personally know people in Micronesia who are able to install solar panels and systems and maintain them. Building solar panels does not require a huge factory with hundreds of people. It can be done in a relatively small building, as long as the people have the proper materials and tools, and know how to do it properly. I really believe that Micronesian islands would benefit, both economically and socially, from additional small industries being introduced. And in some cases, these new enterprises do not even need to be started by outsiders. You Micronesians are intelligent people, I have seen that. You have what it takes, as a people group, to develop new industries, even without the help of people from the outside. I could come up with a whole list of things you could do to start up a business-- even to sell things to people outside Micronesia, or at least outside your home island. There are plenty of things you could do. Making solar panels is just one possibility.
  •  I was thinking solar  industry as opening up factories of solar panels and other components that makes up a solar energy system , you know, some factories where people go to work on production lines to produce the solar products, and an Institution that teach the technology so that  our governments don't have to send students abroad to get the knowledge  they need to carry out their duties in this industry.
  • Only a few people need to know the complicated parts. Most of the people can learn their skills from internet courses, or from on-the-job training. Basic electrical training can be learned at multiple online sites, some of them are free. Business management and marketing can also be learned on the internet. There are many free, and many non-free internet resources to learn these things, and there are many universities and colleges where you can take online courses and earn degrees from your home (if you have internet access and computer). Even though you pay for the college classes, it is generally much less expensive, and much less trouble, than traveling overseas to study.

    Large universities, and large factories, really only work in places where there are many thousands of people nearby. Smaller universities and factories work well where there are fewer people, such as a Micronesian island. Also, when they are begun, it is generally better to start out fairly small with any business (or school, or organization of any kind), and develop the organization until it is profitable, and then logically expand it from there. Don't try to build a factory with 1,000 workers. Build a shop with 5-20 workers, then, as you sell your products, expand to 50 workers, then later, to 100 workers, and on up over the years until you find the best maximum size for your company. Your best maximum size will be determined by several factors, some of which include available labor pool, available property on which to operate, market saturation, materials availability, and management ability.

    There are many good books available about how to begin your own business, and about marketing, management, and so on. Many books you can even buy on Amazon or elsewhere as E-books, so you don't have to be limited by what your book store has available. (well, I'm not sure how the E-books work in Micronesia, you may not have them available, I'm not sure). But there are a lot of great resources out there, and you don't really need to travel abroad to learn how to do these things, although some trips to various places may help.

    The main things you need to start and be successful at an enterprise are:

    1. Interest and/or passion for what you are doing
    2. The ability to educate yourself on the process
    3. A determination to make it happen.
    4. Time and/or resources to devote to the process.

    Not:

    1. A college degree
    2. A large amount of money
    3. Modern facilities
    4. Government involvement

    These last 4 things can be helpful, but are not as crucial as the first four things.

  • edited June 2012

    Thank you;  Mr. Farmer.

    Absolutely we need those four component part to bring in our living room those high tech sophisticated technology or backyard...Yes! i do agree but, do know that we must parallel with our devotion,motives, and passion with God The Greator of all being..

    with all these i will leave it be my final answer!!

    you have a bless day as well...

  • Hanky, you are right. I was not trying to leave God out of this equation, I just meant these things from an economical perspective. But You are right, faith in God is far more important than these other things. If I had a choice between helping someone with their spiritual life, or helping them with their financial or material life, I would far rather help them to know and love God. Thank you for clarifying that.
  • In regard to the  solar energy,  there is no doubt the Islands need large factories to create jobs, and while investment are put to work to  support the great needs for job creation in the private sector, we will need the government involvement to maintaining a strong economical backbone,( the Public Infrustructure).. so all these no government involvement logic is for business minded people only!.. we are talking nations capacity building here.. and The bottom line is, to get out of fossile fuel dependancy while enjoying  our own natural resources.
  • Thats why some times in the long run, the Idea of privatization to  some of our important government enterprises really  concerns me a lot because of  that kind of mentality the Farmer Jim has in regard to our energy crisis.. No government involvement, means no cooperation between government and the private sector?..No way, to go amigo!


  • The main things you need to start and be successful at an enterprise are:

    1. Interest and/or passion for what you are doing
    2. The ability to educate yourself on the process
    3. A determination to make it happen.
    4. Time and/or resources to devote to the process.

    Not:

    1. A college degree
    2. A large amount of money
    3. Modern facilities
    4. Government involvement

    These last 4 things can be helpful, but are not as crucial as the first four things.

    Thats why some times in the long run, the Idea of privatization to  some of our important government enterprises really  concerns me a lot because of  that kind of mentality the Farmer Jim has in regard to our energy crisis.. No government involvement, means no cooperation between government and the private sector?..No way, to go amigo!
    I believe you are misrepresenting what I said, amigo. Did I say the government should not be involved? No, that it is not what I said. What I said was that was not the most important thing. I also stated that it could be helpful. So please, there is no need to go all shark on me.
  • agree with jim

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